Jfcblog’s Blog


Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis
June 24, 2010, 4:01 PM
Filed under: Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis

The number of abusive head traumas among infants and young children appears to have risen dramatically across the United States since the onset of the current recession in 2007, new research reveals.  Abusive head trauma (previously known as “shaken baby syndrome”) is the leading cause of death due to child abuse if you don’t count neglect.   Now we know that poverty and stress are clearly related to child abuse. During times of economic hardship one of the things that’s hardest hit are the social services that are most needed to prevent child abuse. So, this is really worrisome. The study did not find a direct link to unemployment, although most of the patients brought to the E.R. were on medicaid.  According to the researchers, the more likely association is with state and federal social services cuts and psychological stresses propelled by tough times.  Abusive head trauma is one of the most observable indicators of child abuse, because they result from the most extreme domestic violence that requires hospitalization. But there are many, many, many more child abuse cases that we wouldn’t expect to show up as traumatic brain injuries in the ER. So an increase seen in head trauma is probably indicative of an even larger problem. And that means that this finding should really be a major public concern. 

Rachel P. Berger, M.D., M.P.H., assistant professor, pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and attending physician, Children’s Hospital ofPittsburgh; Jay G. Silverman, Ph.D., associate professor, society and humandevelopment and health, and director, Violence Against Women Prevention Research, Harvard University School of Public Health, Boston; May 1, 2010, presentation, Pediatric Academic Societies’ annual meeting, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

 



Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis
June 21, 2010, 3:06 PM
Filed under: Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis

The vast majority of women in state and federal prisons (79%) reported physical abuse and over 60% reported past sexual abuse.  Women in prison are three to four times more likely than male prisoners to have experienced abuse, whether as a child or adult.

www.aclu.org/womensrights/violence.html



Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis
June 21, 2010, 12:17 PM
Filed under: Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis

A history of maltreatment dramatically increases risks for HIV behavior (IV drugs and promiscuity)

Advocates for Youth:Child Sexual Abuse II:A Risk Factor HIV/STDs and Teen Pregnancy



Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis
June 21, 2010, 12:00 PM
Filed under: Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis

70% of women living on the streets or in shelters report abuse in childhood. Over 70% of girls on the streets have run away to flee violence in their homes.

www.theannainstitute.org



Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis
May 21, 2010, 11:42 AM
Filed under: Child Abuse is a Public Health Crisis

Long-term studies have found that young victims of child abuse (Birth to 18) are at higher risk for health diseases if unaddressed or untreated in adulthood.  Also, if a child has experienced trauma in a household environment such as witnessing domestic violence, if a parent is a drug/alcohol abuser, has a disturbed or suicidal household member, or neglected then he/she is at risk also of having a difficult adulthood.  Often times the adult has: depression, anxiety disorders, disrupted neuro-development, difficulty controlling anger, panic reactions, sleep problems, flashbacks, and hallucinations.  The health risk behaviors are: smoking, obesity, suicide attempts, alcohol/drug abuse, self-injury, multiple sex partners.  The long-term consequences of unaddressed trauma is heart disease, cancer, chronic lung disease, asthma, liver disease, skeletal fractures, poor self rated health, STDs, and HIV/AIDS.  The social problems include: homelessness, prostitution, delinquency, violence, inability to sustain employment, re-victimization, rape, negative relationships to others to name a few. (1)  So what is a possible solution? One solution is the earlier the abuse or trauma is diagnosed and addressed by a trained psychologist the better.  If the health, social, and behavioral effects are currently happening, then a psychologist must address the possibility that trauma and child abuse are the root cause and take appropriate measures to work through them and heal the adult.

(1) www.theannainstitute.org



Myth Busters, Child Abuse
April 20, 2010, 11:29 AM
Filed under: MYTH BUSTERS- Child Abuse

MYTH- A child who witnesses domestic violence is not affected the same as children who have been abused or neglected.

FACT- Recent studies have shown that children who witness domestic violence are subject to having emotional, behavioral, and cognitive dysfunction as children and adults similar to those of children who have been abused.  Studies indicate that 10-20% of children are at risk for witnessing domestic violence.

-Written by Nashilla Alibhai



MYTH BUSTERS, Child Abuse
February 12, 2010, 11:16 AM
Filed under: MYTH BUSTERS- Child Abuse

MYTH- Youth who are visiting with online sexual predators are curious about sex.

FACT- While this may be true, the majority of children have histories of sexual and physical abuse offline.

Finkelhor, D., Mitchell, K.J., & Wolak, J. (2000). Online victimization: A report on the nation’s youth (NCMEC 6-00-020). Alexandria, VA, National Center for Missing and Exploiting Children